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  • KB_somgom
    Original poster 2 posts

    Hi! Ubi! Nice to meet you. I am one of the users who likes your game. The reason why I'm writing to you is because I want to talk about Valhalla's ship system. As you know, Valhalla's ship system is fantastic! You can leave the raid with wonderful sailors, and it's possible to move faster than any other ship! Yes, that's all. This ship can only do that.

    So far, ships in the AC series have had their own distinctive characteristics that cause differences from other means of transportation. It had a clear characteristic of why I should use this ship, whether it could be moved only at sea, or if it could be a sea battle that was clearly different from the existing land battles. But what about Valhalla? The only sea trip? This is an advantage that has no meaning as it becomes possible to teach horses how to swim. Sea battle? Ha. Where is the sea battle in Valhalla in the first place? Do you really think playing with sailors in the monastery is a substitute for naval warfare for you?

    Of course, the typical naval battle that most people think of in this era is impossible. At that time, Vikings' ships were much smaller than normal ships, which can be found in the game.

    But what I'm saying is that the use of the ship has become too small. There is no one else in the field who drags boats, and using boats to run in the raid will later make it much easier to ride a learned horse to the monastery and blow the trumpet. This indicates that the proportion of ships is virtually meaningless. Furthermore, this shortcoming will be more apparent because the ship's nature allows it to move only at sea and most of the Baljala terrain is narrow straits.

    I came up with various solutions to this in my head. One of them was to strengthen the elements of battle. As you know, Valhalla's ships do not have any attack elements. The only attack element was the bow used by the player, and even if the enemy was nearby, the allies didn't jump in, they just sat there and shot at the bow.

    So I thought of the 'tactical shooting' skill as a solution to this problem. This is an idea from the previous Odyssey vessel and Brotherhood, where players aim arrows and enter a 'tactical' state if they press a specific key that corresponds to an existing skill. Typical tactical conditions are 'air shooting', 'military input', 'flame bottle throw', and 'tinning tent'. First of all, in the case of 'air shooting', with technology inspired by Odyssey's Rain of Destruction and Valhalla's Banneret Siege, players shoot arrows with their options selected, and sailors shoot arrows in the air in that direction. In the case of 'employees' two members are removed from the ship each time they are used and the condition persists until the technology is released or the enemy is annihilated. The crew will protect the player from nearby enemies and sneak in from non-combat conditions to deal with a few enemies and engage in combat. The more crew members fall out, the slower the ship's movements are proportionally. "Throwing Flame Bottles" automatically targets and throws them in the direction of their enemies. Instead of having the longest cool time, this technology will burn the area in a wide range and cause great damage to the enemy. Finally, tent formation is a defensive and recovery technology that temporarily obscures players and crew when used, which is not accelerated and shotable by opponents within a certain range, and slowly recovers physical strength while inside.

    These systems may not be very attractive initially, but I think they can help make Valhalla's ship system more attractive. In addition, I think that if we strengthen the trap elements of river raids and put in the system, the player will be much more attractive than the existing river raids and have more fun in Valhalla.



    If you're a great company that really cares about users, I want you to take it seriously and not bury it.

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    Contrary to popular belief, Lorem Ipsum is not simply random text. It has roots in a piece of classical Latin literature from 45 BC, making it over 2000 years old. Richard McClintock, a Latin professor at Hampden-Sydney College in Virginia, looked up one of the more obscure Latin words, consectetur, from a Lorem Ipsum passage, and going through the cites of the word in classical literature, discovered the undoubtable source. Lorem Ipsum comes from sections 1.10.32 and 1.10.33 of "de Finibus Bonorum et Malorum" (The Extremes of Good and Evil) by Cicero, written in 45 BC. This book is a treatise on the theory of ethics, very popular during the Renaissance. The first line of Lorem Ipsum, "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet..", comes from a line in section 1.10.32.

    Contrary to popular belief, Lorem Ipsum is not simply random text. It has roots in a piece of classical Latin literature from 45 BC, making it over 2000 years old. Richard McClintock, a Latin professor at Hampden-Sydney College in Virginia, looked up one of the more obscure Latin words, consectetur, from a Lorem Ipsum passage, and going through the cites of the word in classical literature, discovered the undoubtable source. Lorem Ipsum comes from sections 1.10.32 and 1.10.33 of "de Finibus Bonorum et Malorum" (The Extremes of Good and Evil) by Cicero, written in 45 BC. This book is a treatise on the theory of ethics, very popular during the Renaissance. The first line of Lorem Ipsum, "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet..", comes from a line in section 1.10.32.

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