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  • AngryPandaNr1
    Original poster 94 posts

    I don't know if this is possible at all or if it's too much developing for The Division 2.
    But let's pretent that this is for The Division 3.
    This is to fix the "consoles can't do PTS" problem.

    . A 5th character that can only be used during a PTS.
    . A small map like a conflict map (only playable with the 5th character)
    . Let it always act as if we started a new dlc with a boosted character.
    . We start with the new gear/guns/skills or whatever we supposed to test.
    . A mixed vendor with recalibration station where we can choose every item in the game and recalibrate all stats before you "buy" it. (So we can test it in anyway we like)

    . The map has 1 mission to pve and 1 street/field to pvp.
    Or 2-3 missions to pve and 2 streets+field to pvp.
    (Copy paste the missions and a bit of the dz)

    Make it a simple area/map.
    . In the middle the vendor.
    . On the left the mission(s).
    . On the right a door to the DZ/conflict area.

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  • Noxious81
    1257 posts

    Although I really don't buy the reasons why we could not have PTS anymore for consoles, I still think that your suggestions do not solve those issues.

    Basically, we are being told that especially Microsoft and Sony do have such strong restrictions on software being uploaded to their networks that it needs to be thoroughly tested by them. But this would always take so long that Ubi/Massive would not be able to provide a PTS-client for consoles on time and they would also not be able to quickly add changes during the PTS.

    Having to create new game instances and maps is waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay too much additional work which would not even solve the aforementioned problems. And even if they could introduce such a system it would not be of much use for the devs, because changes that require a PTS need an environment as close as possible to the real game (ideally it's the same software version). So most of the findings made in a completely detached small test instance would not be transferable to the actual game.

  • Imagine_Brata
    883 posts

    @noxious81 it usually takes a 4-7 days for a new upload to be approved by sony

  • Noxious81
    1257 posts
    (...) 4-7 days (...)


    Which of course is too long for a PTS phase of two weeks. But I truly can't imagine that huge players on the gaming market like Ubisoft and Microsoft/Sony would not be able to figure out how to approve a rather small patch for a temporary PTS in one day. If they really wanted to, they'd find ways. But they don't want to (for different reasons).

  • CategoryTheory
    138 posts
    A 5th character that can only be used during a PTS.

    This won't work because PTS is and must be a different build of the game. Trying to integrate new code into an existing code base while also maintaining existing, different functionality when that code is "turned off" is a nightmare that is bound to produce behaviour changes and bugs, even crashes, in the existing code.¹ But even worse yet, this code uses and interacts with the "OS" and server-side code of the console vendor and can produce "interesting," confusing and unwanted effects. An obvious example is that you shouldn't be able to get a PlayStation trophy or Xbox achievement in the PTS, and this would need to be carefully tested for each PTS release. But there are many other things like this, too, such as how you deal with an invite to or request to join a group from another player.

    Ubisoft is pretty relaxed about such things when it comes to their own systems. For example, Ubisoft Connect shows me as on line playing Division 2 when I'm actually playing the PTS. Sony and Microsoft no doubt want to be much more strict about such things because it would induce confusion in the user base and consequent technical support costs. (Even just a tiny fraction of users sending in a technical support request is pretty significant when you have tens or hundreds of thousands, of even millions, of users. Ubisoft may see the benefit as worthwhile when they're paying for the technical support, but I doubt that Sony and Microsoft do.)

    @Noxious81 writes:

    Having to create new game instances and maps is waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay too much additional work which would not even solve the aforementioned problems.

    Right. Worse yet, it introduces new problems because now you have a whole new set of interactions from the new code to do your different method of selecting missions and whatnot.

    And even if they could introduce such a system it would not be of much use for the devs, because changes that require a PTS need an environment as close as possible to the real game (ideally it's the same software version).

    I think here you mean "the same software version as the proposed release," right? That's correct. A PTS would be a new copy of the entire production system and data (along the lines of a restore from backup) to which you apply the upgrade process you'd use when you do the production release (thus testing that upgrade process) with only the bare minimum of differences from the real production system (e.g., not triggering achievements) to minimise the risk you're bringing in by not testing exactly what you're going to release.

    __________
    ¹ I know this because I'm a software engineer and one of my core areas of expertise in that field is producing reliable builds. On a large project (and Division 2 is a very large project) that's a lot harder to do than you might think. I've often thought that one of the best things we could do to cripple a competitor would be to give them all our code and let them attempt to produce a well-working build of it.

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