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  • Killorio
    Original poster 7 posts

    Since Assassin's Creed Odyssey I stopped caring about Layla Hassan but I was curious about how she would be handled in Assassin's Creed Valhalla since this was promised as the end of her arc. Thanks to "Gamer Little Playground" I watched the ending for her story (I skipped the Eivor parts as I actually intend to play Assassin's Creed Valhalla someday) and... it was not bad. Certainly not as bad and how Desmond Miles was killed at least but not great either.
    I certainly think it was ridiculous that by chance Layla was stabbed by that simulation device and was fine with it and the Staff of Hermes Trismegistus she was holding sort of conveniently fell right on Basim's... "corpse" I guess and miraculously revived him, so the Staff can revive dead people now? And then it cuts right through Basim at New England's cabin talking to Rebecca and Shaun and they just let him there with the Animus and apparently going along with his mad idea to contact William Miles in person (which is obviously very dangerous to him... "Daniel Cross 2.0") instead of insisting to call him first??? Quite a few gaps there.
    And Layla apparently got stuck in that simulation machine to "slow it down" indefinitely to figure out a better future for Earth but what would she do with it, especially when she is implied to die from radiation, how would she transmit her brilliant solution? She accepted her doomed fate way too easily. Not to mention when she dies, won't the Earth's Cataclysm happen anyway? Templars apparently are no longer a big deal either.
    As dirt as Desmond Miles was done at least he went out with a bang, but Layla Hassan went out with a whimper. Bah. I absolutely missed out a lot of plot stuff in this game, but this ending did not impressed me.

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    Contrary to popular belief, Lorem Ipsum is not simply random text. It has roots in a piece of classical Latin literature from 45 BC, making it over 2000 years old. Richard McClintock, a Latin professor at Hampden-Sydney College in Virginia, looked up one of the more obscure Latin words, consectetur, from a Lorem Ipsum passage, and going through the cites of the word in classical literature, discovered the undoubtable source. Lorem Ipsum comes from sections 1.10.32 and 1.10.33 of "de Finibus Bonorum et Malorum" (The Extremes of Good and Evil) by Cicero, written in 45 BC. This book is a treatise on the theory of ethics, very popular during the Renaissance. The first line of Lorem Ipsum, "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet..", comes from a line in section 1.10.32.

    Contrary to popular belief, Lorem Ipsum is not simply random text. It has roots in a piece of classical Latin literature from 45 BC, making it over 2000 years old. Richard McClintock, a Latin professor at Hampden-Sydney College in Virginia, looked up one of the more obscure Latin words, consectetur, from a Lorem Ipsum passage, and going through the cites of the word in classical literature, discovered the undoubtable source. Lorem Ipsum comes from sections 1.10.32 and 1.10.33 of "de Finibus Bonorum et Malorum" (The Extremes of Good and Evil) by Cicero, written in 45 BC. This book is a treatise on the theory of ethics, very popular during the Renaissance. The first line of Lorem Ipsum, "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet..", comes from a line in section 1.10.32.

  • MakaTV
    1 posts

    @killorio Desmond is not "dead". Layla is in the grey with Desmond and Basim is Loki, tryin to kill William Miles. 😄

  • SouldrinkerLP
    316 posts

    @makatv Why do you think Basim wants to kill William Miles? It's not even slightly hinted at imho.

  • Lavender_Gooms
    16 posts

    @killorio Not in the slightest. It also kind of ruins Kassandra's story as well.

    Kassandra kept the staff safe for 2000 years so that she could give it to Layla... who then drops it and loses it a year later, causing an Isu from the past to get revived and gain access to all the information the Assassins have, to do whatever he wants with it. And since he's Loki, an [censored], whatever he wants will probably be nothing good.

    Dang, girls. Your stories were ultimately all so that this garbage could happen? Someone there really doesn't like you.

  • SouldrinkerLP
    316 posts

    @lavender_gooms The games whole premise is that these mythologies are not what they seem to be. They are basically tales of the Isu being changed over time into legends about gods. So Lokis character traits used in these mythologies are what the history writing Isu saw him as.

    According to the Isus the Assassins (Adam and Eve) are evil and bad. So we were playing the bad guys from the beginning. The actual historical assassins weren't heroes either.

    The question may be: Were Odin and his companions on the side of humans and their rebellion (Assassins) or against it and wanted order and control (Templars). And which story does the norse mythology represent?
    And even with Assassins vs Templars it isn't black & white since AC Rogue at least.

    I hate these words "Good & Evil". AC is not that simple. Every character has motivations which ultimately drive their actions.
    Basim basically accepted his fate of being a reborn Loki. He thought Sigurd is the one who killed his son in the past but in the end realized Eivor was Odin. But Eivor declined Odin. Basim will basically see this and hopefully address this fact in the next game.

    All of this from Basims View was him getting revenge for the wrong doings Odin did to him. He was awakened and became Loki so he thought with Odin happened the same. That's why he wanted to kill Eivor in the end when he realized he was Odins reincarnation. But we as the player (and now maybe even Basim) knows that Eivor declined to be the reincarnation of Odin. (The kill room sequences etc. where you actually fight Odin, unequip your weapons and lock him out (even metaphorically by a door) of his powers over Eivor)

    Edit: And even Odin isn't purely evil. He is possessed by the prophecy (calculations of the future) which showed him die. So he has a motivation for what he does and yes like nearly everyone on this planet he acted egoistically. By doing so he harmed Loki very much. Yes, Loki was from Jotunheim and accepted in Asgar and he didn't follow their rules (because he loved the wrong person) but the rules seem like they are stupid in the first place tbh.

    Edit2: I also don't want to invalidate your opinion but give you another view angle on it which may help you to see it in a different light. (After all Basims reaction at the campfire seeing Eivor wasn't one of disgust or anything. Seems like Basim now knows what Eivor went through)

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