Welcome to discussions

Quick Suggestions

  • Rakbald
    Original poster 2 posts

    So [removed] complaining about a character being traumatised by a [censored] trauma warrants an official apology and a promise of change but tonnes of actual Nordic people pointing out that in our culture you can't name a man Eivor, from the first announcement of the character can be ignored?! There's no chance in hell you'd even consider doing that to an arabic character but our culture is open for appropiation and interpretation despite us protesting?

    You are disgusting hypocrites and I regret ever having supported this company.

    Pick your route and either run everyone over or listen to complaints, this is unacceptable.

  • Contrary to popular belief, Lorem Ipsum is not simply random text. It has roots in a piece of classical Latin literature from 45 BC, making it over 2000 years old. Richard McClintock, a Latin professor at Hampden-Sydney College in Virginia, looked up one of the more obscure Latin words, consectetur, from a Lorem Ipsum passage, and going through the cites of the word in classical literature, discovered the undoubtable source. Lorem Ipsum comes from sections 1.10.32 and 1.10.33 of "de Finibus Bonorum et Malorum" (The Extremes of Good and Evil) by Cicero, written in 45 BC. This book is a treatise on the theory of ethics, very popular during the Renaissance. The first line of Lorem Ipsum, "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet..", comes from a line in section 1.10.32.

    Contrary to popular belief, Lorem Ipsum is not simply random text. It has roots in a piece of classical Latin literature from 45 BC, making it over 2000 years old. Richard McClintock, a Latin professor at Hampden-Sydney College in Virginia, looked up one of the more obscure Latin words, consectetur, from a Lorem Ipsum passage, and going through the cites of the word in classical literature, discovered the undoubtable source. Lorem Ipsum comes from sections 1.10.32 and 1.10.33 of "de Finibus Bonorum et Malorum" (The Extremes of Good and Evil) by Cicero, written in 45 BC. This book is a treatise on the theory of ethics, very popular during the Renaissance. The first line of Lorem Ipsum, "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet..", comes from a line in section 1.10.32.

    Contrary to popular belief, Lorem Ipsum is not simply random text. It has roots in a piece of classical Latin literature from 45 BC, making it over 2000 years old. Richard McClintock, a Latin professor at Hampden-Sydney College in Virginia, looked up one of the more obscure Latin words, consectetur, from a Lorem Ipsum passage, and going through the cites of the word in classical literature, discovered the undoubtable source. Lorem Ipsum comes from sections 1.10.32 and 1.10.33 of "de Finibus Bonorum et Malorum" (The Extremes of Good and Evil) by Cicero, written in 45 BC. This book is a treatise on the theory of ethics, very popular during the Renaissance. The first line of Lorem Ipsum, "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet..", comes from a line in section 1.10.32.

  • Netspook
    287 posts

    @vanillabeare
    I'm a Norwegian and I'm not easily offended, far from it. I think Ubi's name choice was weird, but I don't have any problems with it.

    You do raise an interesting point, though, but that debate is soon over since they'll probably ban you for obvious reasons.

    Btw, Ubi, if you see this: the f word isn't sensored, but an innocent word beginning with garb... that simply means rubbish, is?

  • Rakbald
    Original poster 2 posts

    @netspook

    Yeah, it's likely an excersice in futility trying to make this point as I'm not [removed] with a big following on social media and therefore don't matter. Which only ignites my impotent rage that much more 😝

    I just wish they'd have tried this with a culture that matter to the left...

    And my point is not that they misnamed the character as such but that in every post about this game I've seen someone has protested this without any response but as soon as someone from the [removed] reacts it's the end of the world.

  • forcefrank
    91 posts

    @netspook Hell, they even censor [censored], go figure!

  • dbgager
    158 posts

    @vanillabeare It isnt your modern culture. The game s in 853. SO modern rules do not apply in any way.

  • Chevy_man2010
    83 posts

    I support this. Anyone that knows history & how they stood for honor names had meaning. Men were named with honor & Respect.
    To name a character at the outcry of people saying it isnt culturally inappropriate is to disrespect an entire culture.
    But one person is offended by a single word & its the end of the world.

  • dbgager
    158 posts

    @chevy_man2010 Actually the name Eivor is a unisex name. Thats why they used it. For what it's worth, the U.S. census between 1910 and 1940 listed nine men named Eivor. Some were born in the U.S. and Ireland, which could explain the deviation from tradition. However, the others were born in Sweden, Iceland, Norway and Finland. And that is in the US. Who knows how many are in Scandanavian countries.


    If you don't like it ..Lets have an example of a name that is both male and female.

  • Chevy_man2010
    83 posts

    @dbgager interesting. Explains a bit. Thanks for letting me know.

  • Netspook
    287 posts
    @chevy_man2010 Actually the name Eivor is a unisex name. Thats why they used it. For what it's worth, the U.S. census between 1910 and 1940 listed nine men named Eivor. Some were born in the U.S. and Ireland, which could explain the deviation from tradition. However, the others were born in Sweden, Iceland, Norway and Finland. And that is in the US. Who knows how many are in Scandanavian countries.


    If you don't like it ..Lets have an example of a name that is both male and female.

    Where do you get that from?

    At least here in Norway, Eivor is a female name, and has never been "unisex".

    Currently there are 463 females, and of course ZERO males with Eivor as first name, according to SSB (Statistisk Sentralbyrå) aka Statistics Norway.
    https://www.ssb.no/sok?sok=eivor

  • DreadGrrl
    165 posts

    @dbgager
    I have a female friend named “Daniel.” Despite this outlier, I would never, ever suggest that it was a unisex name.

    The first person I ever met who shared my given name was male. While my given name is (very occasionally) given to men, it really isn’t a “unisex” name. It’s a surname that really only works as a woman’s given name.

  • Netspook
    287 posts
    @netspook https://www.censusrecords.com/Search?FirstName=eivor&Gender=Male&o=LastName&_=1595470005382

    So there you go..

    One person born in Norway on that list, and I can't find that person in any Norwegian records.

    Even if it's correct, a single male with this name in Norwegian history doesn't make it unisex. And in this debate, Norway is the interesting country, since that's where the game's character is from.

  • dbgager
    158 posts

    @netspook US census is completelly accurate. This person did exist. Would you care to suggest a Unisex name then. They are pretty common in the US. I don't know Norwegian names. But its necesarry for both characters to have the same name.


  • Netspook
    287 posts

    @dbgager
    They are NOT common in Norway.

  • dbgager
    158 posts

    @netspook Well then get over it...

  • dbgager
    158 posts

    @dreadgrrl Daniel is not an uncommon female name. Its not pronounced the same way for a female. Dani-ale as apposed to Dan-yul.

  • DreadGrrl
    165 posts

    @dbgager
    Now you’re just being silly. The female variant is spelled very differently.

  • DoctorDoom11235
    7 posts

    Okay.
    Everyone chill.
    Anyone with a background in linguistics or etymology can tell you that names migrate across sexes all the time. "Ashley" or "Ashleigh" was an exclusively male name until the 1900s. "McKenzie" and it's variations was predominantly male until the 1990s. "Sasha" is still a predominantly male name in many eastern European countries while almost exclusively female in the US and elsewhere. Now, to quote a great film... "I'm an American, baby, our names done mean ****," so I am sympathetic to anyone who feels culturally affronted. I do, however, question the level of umbrage taken here.

    However, I would remind you that you're playing a game about ancient aliens. It's a game, and in an age where we demand an orgasmic framerate with minimal load time and minimal memory cost, it's possible building in a feature where you chose a name (or a different name was assigned to male or female) might slow our precious, precious response time.

    So how about this.
    As a white heterosexual male, I am going to accept that while I am accustomed to a world oriented around my preferences, perhaps other people would like their preferences considered as well. I'm going to chill out and not demand my preferences be satisfied to the exclusion of others. I am going to play the game, enjoy my time doing it, and not make a game about ancient aliens into a battleground for a culture war. I encourage everyone else do the same...


  • Chevy_man2010
    83 posts

    @doctordoom11235 fair enough. But I understand why they are upset since someone said something said in the game offended them they removed it immediately which is good & responsible.
    But I also understand if there is backlash to a culturally inappropriate name for when game is based for that culture then people of that culture feel disrespected.
    So to them it feels biased. I see both points of view.
    Personally, I didn't know the difference sadly.

    Im still researching my history which partly is Nordic (not sure if I said that right), Irish, Swedish, Scottish, Native American, & English Isles/Walish.

    But historic accuracy is nice cause Odyssey was on point because I loved Greek mythology in High School.

  • DoctorDoom11235
    7 posts

    @chevy_man2010

    I do have some sympathy for the argument, and maybe Ubisoft could have done a better job picking a specific, more historically accurate, gender neutral name. It's also possible 9th century Norwegian names were never gender neutral.

    To me, the bottom line is that Ubisoft is trying to sell a culturally sensitive game in 2020, which is a difficult proposition and involves a balancing act. I imagine they actually have someone, or an outside consultant, whose job is to figure out how man people will be offended by what and how expensive it is to work around. Are more people going to make a fuss if there is no female protagonist, or if the gender-neutral protagonist's name, in Proto-Norse or Old West Norse is actually gender neutral? Someone complained about text on a screen? Great, Ubisoft's programmers can fix that in a heartbeat for the price of a cup of tea. Someone complains about a name used in a massive percentage of the voice acting? Well that's harder to fix. Post-facto changes like the one the OP alludes to are partially a matter of sensitivity and partially a matter of logistics.

    Also, just for the record, there were three languages (at least) in use during the time period which would have been appropriate: Old West Norse, Old East Norse, and Old Gutnish (which influenced what we now just call "Old Norse"). I make absolutely no claims as to understanding whether Eivor has an origin in any or all of these. There are, I am sure, plenty of scholars who could tell us whether or not its appropriate (and I am sure a few of them are named in the credits for the game), but I am not sure the level of offense the OP takes to this is warranted. Maybe I am wrong. Maybe calling a female Eivor is the equivalent of painting a portrait of the prophet Mohammad (Peace Be Upon Him) using human feces. Something tells me it's not.




Suggested Topics