Welcome to discussions

Quick Suggestions

  • RebelOfWar
    Original poster 10 posts

    These are my issues after 48 hours of playtime:

    - Dodging speed and animation is TOO fast, tune it down as it ruins the overall flow of combat. It doesn't feel right because every other action is 2 times slower and puts me off every time I use it.

    - Fire effects seem to lack in general. Torches don't produce smoke like they did in Origins and "dynamic" fire (the one you can cause in the environment) both lacks smoke + doesn't seem to affect the lighting around it, it looks 2 dimensional and PS3 Era.

    - Cloth physics in this game have been seriously downgraded compared to the previous games. Clothing (especially the cloak, both worn with hood or not) seems to lack fluidity and feels too rigid, as if it's mostly animation instead of actual physics simulation. Even AC2 clothing felt more "alive" than this, for lack of a better word. Some hairstyles also seem to have animation instead of physics as well, trying to fake wind interaction or something. How could you mess this up? Couldn't the same technology from Origins or Odyssey be ported over for this? Disappointed.

    - Many animal executions are unfinished and glitchy as hell. The slightest difference in terrain and/or distance between the player and the animal makes the whole animation look off. Also there is a distinct lack of blood spurts when finishing off wolves, particularly on the final strike (no blood at all) which I noticed back in pre-release footage which is still not improved... Also a couple more kill executions for each animal type (that currently has them) wouldn't hurt, boring to see my character perform the same series of finishing strikes wolf after wolf and bear after bear, add some flavor in your gameplay.

    - Why, in a game finally featuring dismemberment and selling on the Viking cliche, am I penalized for killing civilians??? Odyssey which boasted about the whole hero fantasy allowed this, it even made things interesting by having a bounty meter if you performed too much criminal activity like this... Why did you decide not to implement such a solid feature, especially in a game that would benefit the most by having it included? You instantly cut-off a feature that would only add to the flavor of the gameplay.

    - Flow between animations is still clanky, many animations need more frames added into them and transitions between actions need a ton of fixes. For example, the simple stuff like the player autonomously reaching their hand to light a brazier/etc. with a torch when near them is completely broken, it either can't play fast enough before the fire is lit, or fails to start playing. This was a fully functioning "feature" in Origins, retained in Odyssey as well. Animations can occasionally screw up by the slightest complexity of player movement. Doesn't feel fluid at a compared to Origins.

    - Dismemberment is finally included... But blood occasionally appearing on character seems to have been removed, also still no blood on player weapons in 2020...

    - On PC, I can run the game on 45 fps avg, quite frequently over 50 and reaching 60 fps, but the frametimes are all over the place and I've noticed that after a while of playing, the game gradually starts stuttering finally reaching lags and fps drops of unplayable level. No way this is my system's fault if it proves it can smoothly run the game at 60 in many occasions, also running games like RDR2 no problem for hours and hours. It's most probably a memory leak and faulty optimization in general. What I've found weir in my case is that Valhalla on my PC stutters and suffers fps drops upon first save game load, but if I quit to title and reload same save (not restarting game) the issues are temporarily gone and gameplay is super smooth, for about 15 or 20 ~ 30ish minutes. Temps etc. are fine too. Never experienced this on my pc before.

    All in all that's what I can think off, will add more if I missed something.




  • Contrary to popular belief, Lorem Ipsum is not simply random text. It has roots in a piece of classical Latin literature from 45 BC, making it over 2000 years old. Richard McClintock, a Latin professor at Hampden-Sydney College in Virginia, looked up one of the more obscure Latin words, consectetur, from a Lorem Ipsum passage, and going through the cites of the word in classical literature, discovered the undoubtable source. Lorem Ipsum comes from sections 1.10.32 and 1.10.33 of "de Finibus Bonorum et Malorum" (The Extremes of Good and Evil) by Cicero, written in 45 BC. This book is a treatise on the theory of ethics, very popular during the Renaissance. The first line of Lorem Ipsum, "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet..", comes from a line in section 1.10.32.

    Contrary to popular belief, Lorem Ipsum is not simply random text. It has roots in a piece of classical Latin literature from 45 BC, making it over 2000 years old. Richard McClintock, a Latin professor at Hampden-Sydney College in Virginia, looked up one of the more obscure Latin words, consectetur, from a Lorem Ipsum passage, and going through the cites of the word in classical literature, discovered the undoubtable source. Lorem Ipsum comes from sections 1.10.32 and 1.10.33 of "de Finibus Bonorum et Malorum" (The Extremes of Good and Evil) by Cicero, written in 45 BC. This book is a treatise on the theory of ethics, very popular during the Renaissance. The first line of Lorem Ipsum, "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet..", comes from a line in section 1.10.32.

    Contrary to popular belief, Lorem Ipsum is not simply random text. It has roots in a piece of classical Latin literature from 45 BC, making it over 2000 years old. Richard McClintock, a Latin professor at Hampden-Sydney College in Virginia, looked up one of the more obscure Latin words, consectetur, from a Lorem Ipsum passage, and going through the cites of the word in classical literature, discovered the undoubtable source. Lorem Ipsum comes from sections 1.10.32 and 1.10.33 of "de Finibus Bonorum et Malorum" (The Extremes of Good and Evil) by Cicero, written in 45 BC. This book is a treatise on the theory of ethics, very popular during the Renaissance. The first line of Lorem Ipsum, "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet..", comes from a line in section 1.10.32.

Suggested Topics

Community Details

279
Online
231.5k
Users
38.6k
Topics
191.5k
Posts