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  • evilhippo
    Original poster 79 posts

    Good: many of the quests are really well conceived & executed, with quite a few of the 'world events' being charming, tragic, hilarious. The NPCs are generally plausible & the World Event stories well thought out, and paying close attention to what they actually say is important. The gameplay mechanics are quite good for the most part (I really like the 'elite' assassination mechanic in particular). The fortress assaults are very well done, with a real sense of being part of a larger battle (much better than the strange scrum-like battles in AC:Odyssey). The fight with Odin annoyed me at first but once I figured out what to do, it is actually a stroke of genius & made perfect sense, requiring a bit of lateral thinking rather than just trying to dig the same hold deeper.

    Bad: the real stand-out clunker is the interminable end-game boss fight with Basim. One of the cardinal sins of game design is inconsistency of rules/mechanics, and this fight uses mechanics not seen anywhere in the game prior to that point (this enemy has no health, can only be taken down using a mechanic seen only in this fight, and that is *terrible* game design).

    Ugly: missed opportunities like using the vast collection of collectables you eventually amass to decorate your bedroom (I think you get to add a jack o'lantern & a book... whoopty doo). The disguise ability should be less generic (how about we steal a monk's outfit first time we use that 'blend in' ability or some such). The traders should be less generic & have different stock from each other.

    The game is somewhat 'politically correct', but by the dismal standards of modern game design, it is not too in-your-face, which is admittedly a low bar to jump (female warriors should be very rare & a sub-Saharan African blacksmith appearing in a Viking village in England without so much as a word of explanation where they came from & how they got there is glaringly & hilariously incongruous 😁).

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    Contrary to popular belief, Lorem Ipsum is not simply random text. It has roots in a piece of classical Latin literature from 45 BC, making it over 2000 years old. Richard McClintock, a Latin professor at Hampden-Sydney College in Virginia, looked up one of the more obscure Latin words, consectetur, from a Lorem Ipsum passage, and going through the cites of the word in classical literature, discovered the undoubtable source. Lorem Ipsum comes from sections 1.10.32 and 1.10.33 of "de Finibus Bonorum et Malorum" (The Extremes of Good and Evil) by Cicero, written in 45 BC. This book is a treatise on the theory of ethics, very popular during the Renaissance. The first line of Lorem Ipsum, "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet..", comes from a line in section 1.10.32.

    Contrary to popular belief, Lorem Ipsum is not simply random text. It has roots in a piece of classical Latin literature from 45 BC, making it over 2000 years old. Richard McClintock, a Latin professor at Hampden-Sydney College in Virginia, looked up one of the more obscure Latin words, consectetur, from a Lorem Ipsum passage, and going through the cites of the word in classical literature, discovered the undoubtable source. Lorem Ipsum comes from sections 1.10.32 and 1.10.33 of "de Finibus Bonorum et Malorum" (The Extremes of Good and Evil) by Cicero, written in 45 BC. This book is a treatise on the theory of ethics, very popular during the Renaissance. The first line of Lorem Ipsum, "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet..", comes from a line in section 1.10.32.

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