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  • cnnryng
    Original poster 16 posts

    I'm about to ask a lot of questions that will spoil the ending so only read on if you've finished it. I'd genuinely like someone answers if anyone knows...
    Absolutely loved this game until the last couple hours and I'm intensely confused and perplexed.

    spoiler

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    Contrary to popular belief, Lorem Ipsum is not simply random text. It has roots in a piece of classical Latin literature from 45 BC, making it over 2000 years old. Richard McClintock, a Latin professor at Hampden-Sydney College in Virginia, looked up one of the more obscure Latin words, consectetur, from a Lorem Ipsum passage, and going through the cites of the word in classical literature, discovered the undoubtable source. Lorem Ipsum comes from sections 1.10.32 and 1.10.33 of "de Finibus Bonorum et Malorum" (The Extremes of Good and Evil) by Cicero, written in 45 BC. This book is a treatise on the theory of ethics, very popular during the Renaissance. The first line of Lorem Ipsum, "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet..", comes from a line in section 1.10.32.

    Contrary to popular belief, Lorem Ipsum is not simply random text. It has roots in a piece of classical Latin literature from 45 BC, making it over 2000 years old. Richard McClintock, a Latin professor at Hampden-Sydney College in Virginia, looked up one of the more obscure Latin words, consectetur, from a Lorem Ipsum passage, and going through the cites of the word in classical literature, discovered the undoubtable source. Lorem Ipsum comes from sections 1.10.32 and 1.10.33 of "de Finibus Bonorum et Malorum" (The Extremes of Good and Evil) by Cicero, written in 45 BC. This book is a treatise on the theory of ethics, very popular during the Renaissance. The first line of Lorem Ipsum, "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet..", comes from a line in section 1.10.32.

  • FylkirPanzer
    180 posts

    @cnnryng
    The Asgard and Jotunheim Arcs, as well as completing all of the Animus Anomolies explains that Loki, Evior, Sigurd, and others are reincarnations of the Gods. Odin spent the Jotunheim Arc looking for a way to escape Ragnarok (the Cataclysm of Isu wrapped in a Norse skin) via reincarnation.

    1. There were numerous instances where Basim recognized that Eivor was also a possible reincarnation. One of which is when Sigurd, Basim, and Eivor find the stone and Eivor has his vision with Odin. Basim eyes him warily and smiles a bit at the end of the cutscene.
    2. Since Odin was told that a wolf would kill him at Ragnarok, he constantly looks for ways to harm and kill Fenrir, even fighting him at some point, but it wasn't until later that Odin found out that Fenri was Loki's son. Odin had sworn a blood oath to Loki to never harm his children, Loki became enraged. So Odin broke his oath and fought Fenrir multiple times, thereby harming Loki's son, which then places Loki on the path of revenge against Odin and later Eivor after they're all reincarnated. Loki is a trickster God in Norse myth. Loki/Basim played the long game with enacting their revenge against the one who wronged him.
    3. Basim is the reincarnation of Loki, Loki's son is Fenrir, the giant wolf.
    4. I didn't closely follow that bit. My guess is something to do with figuring out where the energy output was originating from. The simulation device was in fact, Yggdrasil, the huge magnetic field generator, it was just also capable of simulations and other things.
    5. Isu temples/devices were all over the world. If I recall correctly, Desmond activated all Isu locations after he died in the vault North America. That vault was a repository for all Isu technological centers, which also activated most if not all of the rest of them, or at least put them on standby.
    6. I don't really recall AC3 that much, but that was his purpose, to kill himself and activate the shield that would surround Earth to protect it from solar flares, but it also ended up activating a lot more than just a shield.
    7. I'm honestly unsure, my guess is that they wanted answers and Basim would provide those answers.


    I suppose Basim will play the protagonist/antagonist for the next installment or two of AC games, who knows at this point. I personally don't like what they did with Odin at the end, but it is what it is. Maybe we'll get further in game explanations.

  • gentester
    65 posts

    From my memories of Norse mythology I never really saw Loki as evil, mischievous yes, misguided sometimes and what starts out as mischievous pranks tend to get well out of hand for him sometimes, but not evil in a Christian sense - he's the chaos to balance out the order, there's no real good v evil thing in Norse myths. 
    Whereas I always felt Odin for a so called god of wisdom showed a startling lack of it. The whole business with Fenrir in the old myths was more or less a self fulfilling prophecy. You treat someone badly enough for no reason (except a dubious prophecy of what they may possibly do in the future) and sooner or later they will give you a reason.
    I think this was portrayed well in the game, I have some sympathy for someone who actually didn't turn fully against Odin until his son (and presumably his other children from what he says) were treated appallingly badly. I would imagine Shaun and Rebecca feel as similarly conflicted by Loki/Basim as I do.
    Loki had no real beef with Tyr, who had actually treated Fenrir comparatively well and was as much in the dark about Odins' intentions as Fenrir was, he had no reason to want revenge against Tyr/Sigurd. 
    What suddenly sparked Basim/Loki into realising for certain Eivor was Odin I don't know, its never explained in game, maybe Basim had his own set of dreams to deal with, after all he's a reincarnation himself not actually Loki in the flesh so to speak.
    However until Basim/Loki goes into the animus himself to experience things as Eivor he may have thought Eivor had known they were Odin all along and were deceiving everyone again, being in the animus and realising Eivor turned their back on Odin preferring to be just Eivor may change his preconceptions a bit, if you take Basim/Loki out of the animus after the final game segments and take him outside to sit on one of the benches facing the sea by the firepit there's a very brief tiny scene which may back up that idea.
    As far as Shaun and Rebecca are concerned Basim/Loki didn't kill Layla, the radiation and her dropping the staff did that, although they know he tried to kill Eivor that event happened millennia ago as far as they are concerned and Basim/Loki simply took advantage of the staff dropping at his feet. We know as onlookers, and from what Basim/Loki said in game, that some or all of it was planned (even then we don't know that Layla's death was part of the plan or simply to get her to bring the staff into the temple) but Shaun and Rebecca wouldn't have that knowledge at all.
    I'm suprised the game ignored Juhani Berg from Rogue, his abstergo animus revealed he was a Viking raider at Lindisfarne so he could have fitted in well
    Wanting to bring his family back means Loki needs a living world - without world breaking end of times events - into which they can be reincarnated and I think he fits into the Assassin side of the game pretty well and will either make a good player character or a good enemy for a future game (especially if they manage to fix the bandy legged knees permanently bent thing finally).

  • Kormac67
    816 posts
    How the f*ck does Ubisoft think it's ok to leave us playing as Basim - the bad guy - and going back into the animus after all of that as if it's nothing?

    Yeah, precisely. I felt quite upset about this turnout of things.
    Not to mention the gaping plot holes - how did Basim get there? Did he charter a second viking ship? How did he get back? Does a 8th century guy know how to use someone's credit card and book a flight or what? He doesn't even speak present day English.
    So much for Darby's Great Storytelling. 🙄
    Hoping Layla will return in DLC, grab back her staff and turn him to dust.

    This strengthens my opinion, get rid of all the animus-present-day garbage and make a viking story, plain and simple.

  • TRIFFIDS
    2 posts

    @kormac67

    Even more: I’ve played the last mission in Asgard after ending the main plot, the Order, get Excalibur, Mjollnir... So, it’s Basim/Loki (impersonating Eivor) who finally tied Fenrir, his own son, after all he has said and done along the game... Still waiting some kind of reaction.

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