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  • Photokrow
    Original poster 9 posts

    So this doesn't really affect gameplay and it's not the biggest problem if you have no grasp of the Icelandic language whatsoever, but if you do speak Icelandic then the mistakes Ubisoft makes with the language are really immersion-shattering.

    To start with just a few;

    -Eivor is a name in both Old Norse and Modern Icelandic (which is close to Old Norse), however it is a feminine-exclusive name. A man named Eivor is like a man named Susan or Bethany.

    -There's a bit near the beginning while Eivor is rescuing her crew, she tells an enemy "You just killed yourself Ergi! (coward)"

    "Ergi" does not mean "coward", it is an emasculating insult with specific homophobic connotations. Even something as simple as "You just killed yourself Ergi! (womanly)" would have been more accurate. But if we want to be exact it would be something like "gay" or "tr*nnie"

    -The game repeateadly uses "Drengir" to mean Warrior except...Drengir means "boy." Drengir is not what you call Sven Bear-Strangler, it's what you call his son, little 5 year old Anders Svensson. The codex entry for "Drengir" even tries to suggest "badass" as a translation, which...no. Not even close.

    -This is another little nitpick I have and it is a minor one. But most of the people who emigrated to Ravensthorpe from Norway are all supposed to be from Fornburg right? So why do they have such different accents? Dag and Randvi for example sound much more "Swedish" than "Norweigian", (probably owing to their Swedish voice actors so I am not gonna get too hung up on this one.)

    -Perhaps my biggest nitpick; anytime you use the sagas as a source, you have to be extremely careful. The sagas didn't exist until the 13th Century, well after Scandinavia had Christianized and CENTURIES after all of this "Great Heathen Army" stuff went down. And people wouldn't have talked about these "sagas" much at the time because like I said, they didn't exist yet.

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    Contrary to popular belief, Lorem Ipsum is not simply random text. It has roots in a piece of classical Latin literature from 45 BC, making it over 2000 years old. Richard McClintock, a Latin professor at Hampden-Sydney College in Virginia, looked up one of the more obscure Latin words, consectetur, from a Lorem Ipsum passage, and going through the cites of the word in classical literature, discovered the undoubtable source. Lorem Ipsum comes from sections 1.10.32 and 1.10.33 of "de Finibus Bonorum et Malorum" (The Extremes of Good and Evil) by Cicero, written in 45 BC. This book is a treatise on the theory of ethics, very popular during the Renaissance. The first line of Lorem Ipsum, "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet..", comes from a line in section 1.10.32.

    Contrary to popular belief, Lorem Ipsum is not simply random text. It has roots in a piece of classical Latin literature from 45 BC, making it over 2000 years old. Richard McClintock, a Latin professor at Hampden-Sydney College in Virginia, looked up one of the more obscure Latin words, consectetur, from a Lorem Ipsum passage, and going through the cites of the word in classical literature, discovered the undoubtable source. Lorem Ipsum comes from sections 1.10.32 and 1.10.33 of "de Finibus Bonorum et Malorum" (The Extremes of Good and Evil) by Cicero, written in 45 BC. This book is a treatise on the theory of ethics, very popular during the Renaissance. The first line of Lorem Ipsum, "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet..", comes from a line in section 1.10.32.

  • Outlander1982
    117 posts

    @photokrow I don't speak Icelandic but there's 2 things that I can answer spoiler

    Randvi is not from Fornburg.

  • Photokrow
    Original poster 9 posts

    @outlander1982 Ok cool. I just started playing a few days ago so I'm not quite all the way caught up and I don't really know all the deets in the story. Though I did notice the "simulation shenanigans" early-on, when you pick Eivor's gender now that you mention it.

    Though that's funny with the animus. It reminds me of a real-life archeological oopise; "We've just unearthed a male Viking skeleton. We know the remains are of a male because he was buried with weapons." And then years later someone said; "Hey, did anyone actually take a close look at the pelvic bones of this "male" Viking warrior?"

  • Outlander1982
    117 posts

    @photokrow Sorry for spoiling a big part of the game,if you are not familiar with this concept in the series,you will probably understand how and why when you finish the mythical arc.

  • ImaginaryRuins
    361 posts

    @photokrow Is this the first time you play an Assassin's Creed game? The series goes way back in the 2000s and has built quite a lore now. I will never say I am an AC know-it-all but I have played all main titles in the series and have finished AC Valhalla. If you have questions, feel free to ask and I will do my best to answer.

  • Photokrow
    Original poster 9 posts

    @imaginaryruins No I played Assassin's Creed 1, Assassin's Creed 2, and Assassin's Creed Odyssey. I'm familiar with the animus and how it ties into the overall story with Abstergo and whatnot.

  • Photokrow
    Original poster 9 posts

    @outlander1982 Don't worry about spoilers, I think the focus on "avoiding spoilers" is really overblown. I haven't had knowledge of spoilers affect my enjoyment of something all that often and in many cases, I would actually have preferred to know spoilers. For a Ubisoft-related example I was expecting Far Cry 5 to be a fun mindless "Kill the Trumpanzees!" FPS. Had I known the story would actually be about the player-character's drug-induced brainwashing by the villain I never would have played it and I would have been much happier as a result of never playing it. (Which is apparently something of a recurring theme in Far Cry as well, not that I would know as I never really played Far Cry before.)

  • MicHaeL_MonStaR
    18 posts

    @photokrow - For the "drengir"-part, perhaps they took some liberties in language?
    Because I've found this; drengr - Wiktionary (And isn't that how it's spelled in this game? - I don't remember, I only pay half attention to subtitles.)

    This is not about an Icelandic word, but Proto-Germanic, and on that page there are multiple definitions:

    1. a valiant, gallant, chivalrous man
    2. ladyouth, a boy.
    3. one who is bold, reckless, or inexperienced.


    So I guess in a way the third would apply?...

    What's more is that it says it's similar to the Old-English word 'dreng', which indeed means 'warrior' or 'soldier'.
    And considering this story takes place in some form of very old England, I can see where they're coming from with "drengr" or "drengir".

    I don't understand what words are supposed to be from what language anyway, as they're all speaking English that was written by people alive today, spoken by actors alive today.
    It's like those movies and shows in which characters (played by mostly English-speaking actors in the 20th or 21st century) from different countries (where they don't speak (modern) English) just speak English with each other and somehow all understand everything clearly. - That's immersion-shattering in and of itself, so to indeed nitpick about specific words or terms is a bit moot.
    As for this game; I feel like those foreign words thrown into the English, such as "drengr" or "hugr" is kinda forced and weirdly unnecessary anyway. - It's like they're trying to teach kids new words.

    But let's be realistic here; This is a videogame, a piece of entertainment, with a fictional story set many centuries ago that also throws in a bunch of mythology come to life.
    I can't be bothered about accuracy in terms of language and history. - I've seen posts complaining about how "Such and such isn't how Vikings did it!".
    So?... Who cares??... Who REALLY knows???...
    Don't get me wrong; They shouldn't just make claims that things are facts, and I'd like things to be a little accurate to perhaps learn a thing or two.
    But the thing is, they're not making such claims. If anything, they clearly state on the splash-screen that it's fictitious, as with pretty much any game.

    ----------

    As for the issue with the name Eivor (being feminine), which I've seen people lament before; I almost feel like this game was supposed to just have the female Eivor at first.
    Like they moved from a male in "Origins" to both male and female in "Odyssey" and possibly just female in "Valhalla". - But perhaps decided, after writing and even acting, to also have a male version.
    This is a very rough and somewhat far-fetched theory, either that or they just liked the name Eivor and went with it for both sexes.
    Honestly, I don't care, being friggin' genderfluid myself, and I've never switched off the female Eivor so far. - It might come across as silly to certain people who KNOW, but so be it.

  • MicHaeL_MonStaR
    18 posts

    Just to reiterate: In this game, you literally go to Asgard, fight mythical creatures, oh, and jump off towers into haystacks and survive.

  • TORFINR
    322 posts

    Ubisoft made us a feel good reality game with vikings.
    Ubisoft made us a political correct viking game with African vikings.
    Ubisoft wanted our money,
    Ubisoft had our money,
    Ubisoft doesnt care anymore, but hey, soon you'll be hyped for the next awesome Ubisoft title! Stay tuned!

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