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  • pesto.
    Original poster 183 posts

    I’ve been enjoying Valhalla a lot, but I have some thoughts on progression.

    Character leveling

    This takes its time and feels about right, but enemy scaling never really catches up and once again nightmare difficulty is only that difficult when you’re facing big bosses, elsewise it’s far too easy.

    Horse

    Waaaaay too quick. This is your companion for most of the game, it needs to be more fleshed out IMO. You’ll buy the horse upgrades pretty much immediately because they’re so cheap and that’s all the progress you get from this side.

    I’d like to see in future games a more in depth upgrade path for horse skills. Not just different steeds but saddles, stirrups etc that are not just cosmetic upgrades but increase stats.

    Also while it’s better than Odyssey with its straight to the ground pose, the animations and feel could be improved. Check out RDR2 and all the little details there. Things that stand out are lack of trot animation, personality animation (ear flicks etc), instant vertical movement drop when you move over a surface that drops away slightly. Right now the horse lacks personality in general, it doesn’t really follow so much, doesn’t get annoyed at running through endless brush, a horse entering or exiting water needs to act like a real horse, I.e. nervous. Give this pet more detail please!

    Longship

    This feels like a missed opportunity. There’s some leveling up with the raids DLC but honestly I miss the Adresta and upgrading all sorts of bits of the boat. I get that Ubi might feel that “it’s been done” and there’s nothing new to add to naval combat “so why do it?”. But I really feel this would have made a fantastic starting point for a game that’s the naval equivalent of those space games where you buy new ships, do trading, take on missions, maybe even get smaller autonomous ships as a fleet.

    At the very least it would have been nice to be able to upgrade the speed and turning.

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  • OrcBeard92
    161 posts

    @pesto Agree with a lot of what you've said. One comment I'd say about Odyssey doing slightly better with the horses is that it introduced you to the mount in a more organic way, actually giving a little segment in the quest where you pick your first horse, give it a name etc.

    And whether it was because of games like the Witcher or not, having the player character call out to their horse as Phobos lent a little more attachment to them. It's a very tiny thing but it did help. Origins did something slightly similar where it would give mounts a little backstory and a name at least. Valhalla just gives you access to the horses off the bat without a huge deal of weight behind it. They have names, but it doesn't even really explain what they mean or why they are what they are, unless it's from the helix store. Just small things that end up adding up to a bigger issue.

    It might be a design choice to say that Vikings would've viewed the relationship with horses as a more functional thing though. Hard to say.

    I like that the Longship in general feels slightly more intimate than the Adrestia did. You can see everyone's faces and hear them laugh and talk, and tell stories. The Adrestia certainly felt alive, with the shanties and the creaking of ropes and wood, the sound of the waves and the men below deck pulling the oars. Valhalla in general is a more understated and ambient game I guess, compared to the more bombastic naval sequences in Origins and Odyssey.

    That being said, I would've appreciated some more 'realistic' approaches to the Longship designs. I find myself returning to the more simpler wood carvings available for the hull and prow etc. rather than the giant bright glowing sails and golden figureheads you can unlock. Odyssey had a nicer balance when it came to this where you could pick and choose from a big array of nice paint jobs and sails, without you ship feeling like a cluttered mass of metal. Longships are supposed to be sleek and fast!

    I agree with a lot of what you mention though. It's nowhere near the level of realism of something like Red Dead, but it could get a bit closer to it with a few quality updates. Valhalla is missing some detail in the bigger picture that other games nailed. Even Origins did a better job in a few regards.

    To add to what you've listed here, I'd also like the option to see what horses we have unlocked in the stable, as opposed to generic ones. Same goes for the aviary that is mentioned there. Seeing a few ravens or other birds knocking around would be nice, even though it's probably only Synin the black raven who is the real Synin.

  • mentraton
    27 posts

    The character progression is completely broken!
    The game is ridiculously easy! I already call it AC Walking Simulator

    The missing enemy scaling breaks the game! There are 3 lvl 90 areas and it’s impossible to be not over leveled for everything beyond that.

    I don’t upgrade my gear and sitting on 60 unspent points to not make it worse.
    Odyssee and Immortals are much better games in that regard.

    Valhalla is a complete failure and so boring due to that immortal godlike character that I stop playing it.
    At least I don’t have to deal with all the bugs. Which are becoming more and more each patch. Since yesterday the game spams me with the tattoo pattern and auto/quick save is broken.

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