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  • AlfaSnowman
    Original poster 24 posts

    A new difficulty option with only:

    • You can die from 2-3 light hits or 1 heavy.
    • Enemies can die from 2-3 light hits or 1 heavy.
    • A heavy attack can make you lose your shield and force you to pick it back up.
    • Item upgrades are for esthetics only.
    • Instant assassination by default.
    • Master assassin stealth difficulty by default.
    • Optional crosshair to prevent sniping abuse.
    • Enemy view cone should be a right angle triangle when not looking directly up (the further they are from ex. a building, the easier they can see the roof)
    • Climbing or running across roofs attracts guards or makes citizens warn the guards.
    • A handicapped skill tree with only 'realistic' abilities. (Guided arrows or seeing enemies through walls and so on is greyed out. Why do these exist in the first place?)
      • (getting to these abilities is about spending points until you get there, but you don't receive stat upgrades along the way (to prevent unbalance with the rest).
    • Penalties for killing people besides targets. (Actual stealth gameplay instead of mass murdering everyone. Maybe a 'knock unconscious' ability besides the sleep ability would be welcome like in Odyssey)
    • Whistling attracts 'all' the guards who can hear it, instead of them coming one by one (because animals don't whistle like that?).


    The things mentioned here are far from impossible to achieve. These can make a huge impact on approaching ingame situations and create a great sense of achievement. Hitting an enemy healthsponge 50 times to kill them does not.

    Right now AC is about mass murdering and no longer about stealth assassinations.

    AC has forgotten what its creed is all about, all to appease a larger market. There is nothing wrong with that, but at least give 'true' (and challenging) stealth gameplay a new chance, even if it is an optional difficulty. 🙂


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  • Ubi-Wan
    Ubisoft Support Staff 635 posts

    @alfasnowman Thanks for sending these suggestions on a new game difficulty setting our way! We'll be glad to forward your feedback up to our team. Personally, I'm a fan of the idea of knocking NPC's unconscious when looking for a more stealthy playthrough. Thanks for sharing!

    Official Response
  • AlfaSnowman
    Original poster 24 posts

    The development team from Ghost Recon Breakpoint did this in a great way by making gameplay elements 'optional' with a thing called 'immersive mode' in the menu. This way they can appease a larger market without forcing things on the player base.
    Freedom to customize gameplay has always been a great thing and can really make a game way more enjoyable and add replayability at the same time. Especially the 'darker nights' setting in Breakpoint had a lot of positive feedback, since bright nights seem to be in every Ubisoft game and many players feel that it destroys immersion (check the forums). 🙂

    If AC could do this in the same way, it could at the same time report back statistics to the AC team about what gameplay customizations the user base prefers. This is valuable data that could be used for future developments.
    AC Origins had something similar with the Animus control panel, though I don't know if that reported back usage data to the developers. It was a great tool nonetheless.

    In AC it could be called something like 'dark age' mode or difficulty, referring to time period of the game and how dangerous the world was in those times. 🙂
    (A poll or voting contest could help to know how people think about this. The developers from Anno 1800 did it for their DLC some time ago and it had a lot of feedback.)

    This can add an extra layer of immersion and connection with the already wonderfully created world of a dark age England. This is because it counters the 'arcadey' feeling of open world games by just rushing to points on the map (something that happens after a while with big and long open world games). An arcadey feeling arises from the fact that there is no real constant threat from the surroundings and gives the player the feeling that he/she just runs from point A to B and therefore no longer takes in the world and story over time. There is a reason people started to ask for a walk button in the past with the ability to customize the movement speed (great addition btw). People just love to customize the way they play their game.

    The bandit ambushes are an excellent addition, but offer no sense of danger (imagine if they pulled up a rope in the middle of the road to throw you of your horse and surround you 🙂 ).
    Raids and castle sieges would feel rewarding and would make the story stand out more if they were more difficult. Castle sieges are so easy that they feel more like an unnecessary thing that the player is forced upon, instead of a rewarding experience. (The mechanics about them are great, but there is no feel of accomplishment). Destroying supplies and siege defenses feels pointless in its current state, because you can win easily without destroying them.

    Imagine the following going on in your mind as a player:

    • I am facing a castle siege.
    • This is going to be a real challenge.
    • But the treasure behind the walls is really worth it.
    • Should I lower its defenses first by destroying supplies and siege defenses?
    • Time to prepare myself (stocking potions, choosing the best weapon for the job).
    • This was very challenging and felt tension all the time because of the constant danger and need of focus on the surroundings, but I finally did it.
    • Rewarded with treasure/story progression and a great sense of accomplishment (maybe an achievement too).


    Succeeding in doing something hard, is always a rewarding experience. Doing easy stuff is boring.
    Raising the enemy healthpool is not a solution. There are many threads and reviews complaining about this (doesn't matter what game it is).
    It should be:

    • HP player = HP enemy.
    • DMG (light attacks) player = DMG (light attacks) enemy; same for heavy attacks.
    • Choosing the right weapon for the job (attack speed/stamina consumption) and avoiding group fights (unless your really good) would add a new dimension to combat.
    • Enemies should block/dodge more.


    Valhalla has the best mechanics of all AC games to date and proves that its team listens to customer feedback. (and therefore I salute you :))

    Keep up the good work!


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